Video 26 Jul 925,828 notes

thevirginityslayer:

edwardspoonhands:

moeranda:

itseliberg33:

can she just get an award or something

I reblog this whenever it pops up on my dash.

So many directions she could have gone with this joke…out of infinite possibilities…she picked the best possible direction.

Best video in the world

I can’t watch the GIFs without thinking about the music that plays when she dances with the watermelons. [x]

(Source: aryanstark)

Video 24 Jul 54 notes

weneeddiversebooks:

The #WNDB team is DELIGHTED to announce that it has recently welcomed some new team members! We’ll be highlighting them on this site over the next few days. Please give a warm welcome to Kristy Shen and Bryce Leung, who have been working night and day as newly-minted #WNDB Webmasters. 

Bryce and Kristy are engineers and a husband and wife writing tag-team Their awesome middle grade debut Little Miss Evil (Spencer Hill Middle Grade) comes out March 1, 2015. Here’s the blurb for their book:

When you live in a volcano, ride to school in a helicopter, and regularly see your dad on the news with the caption “EVIL GENIUS” underneath his picture, it takes a lot to rattle you.

Until you get a message that says: We have your father. Deliver the NOVA in 24 hours or we will kill him.

What’s a NOVA you ask? It’s a nuclear bomb capable of turning the city into a radioactive mushroom cloud, and ever since Fiona’s dad built it, it’s caused nothing but grief. But telling him to stop building weapons is like telling Michelangelo to stop painting.


And that’s why thirteen-year-old Fiona has a flamethrower strapped to her arm. After all, who’d mess with a girl who can throw fireballs?

Apparently, these guys.

Big mistake.

Give Bryce and Kristy a warm welcome by adding Little Miss Evil to your Goodreads shelf. And when our amazing new #WNDB website goes up, know that they deserve the lion’s share of the credit! 

Yay, Bryce and Kristy!!!

Hey, I know them, we’re represented by the same literary agency. :)

Text 24 Jul 3 notes I suck at titles

If someone who is good at naming things could help me out that would be nice. I wrote a short story that I am having trouble naming and if you want to read it and suggest a title that would be cool. E-mail me or talk to me. Also happy to take comments on its suckiness as a story to make it less sucky as a story.

It is approximately 10,000 words and contains multiple queer people and no sex but discussions of sex sometimes. And lots of crapping on the tropes that rule relationship expectations.

Liiiiiiiike contact me if you wanna read my story.

Text 22 Jul 15 notes spellcheck

Today I was editing a document at work and my spellchecker pointed out the words “to” and “address” had been squished together with no space.

It suggested I correct “toaddress” to “toad dress.”

I have been laughing since.

Now I want some Tumblr artists to draw me some toad dresses.

Text 22 Jul 55 notes Sass

hell-is-okcupid:

http://i547.photobucket.com/albums/hh466/Jellybean_Disaster/sass_zps57ee7c25.jpg

So, what you mean is, even though you aren’t interested in what I have to say, I should still pay attention to you?

oh ok

I got something just like this once. The guy said my profile was too long and that he literally wanted me to e-mail him a short summary. He praised my pictures and expected me to be flattered.

Honey. If your criteria of who you want to talk to consists of them being a certain hotness and my picture has fulfilled that requirement, and what she says in her profile is of so little interest to you that you want someone to mail you a Cliff’s Notes version so you can do a half-assed job of understanding her AS IF THE ACTUAL INTERACTION WITH HER MIND IS FRIGGING HOMEWORK YOU WANT HER TO HAND-HOLD YOU THROUGH, I can promise you right now that WE ARE NOT WHAT EACH OTHER ARE LOOKING FOR.

And if you’d read even the first paragraph of my profile then you’d know that. I am trying to make it easier for you people to not bother talking to me if I would be such a waste of your precious time. And then you still want me to humor you as if you have something I want.

Photo 21 Jul 17 notes spacejuliet:

swankivy:

So You Write comic #38: Hater Love.
This may be exaggerated, but it’s true for me: I’m much more likely to agree with my critics (and adjust my writing in response!). Five people could praise a favorite line and then if one person thought it was silly, I’d probably start leaning toward believing it was silly. Some of this is good, adaptive behavior: you WANT readers who will tell you what’s wrong with your story and push you to make it better. But some of it is just Insecure Writer Syndrome™. For some of us, if one reader criticizes something we wrote, we suddenly can’t see the scene the same way and it will bug us until we fix it.
There’s such a thing as too much of this, but most of us have a healthy level of ability to take criticism seriously. We won’t throw our manuscripts in the fireplace and quit writing forever if someone dislikes our work, but we’ll obsess over criticism and it will seem magnified in our minds. This is generally a good thing unless it paralyzes our ability to draft without too much fear. However, much worse than this is its opposite: the authors who savor only the praise and automatically ignore criticism. These are the authors who are more likely to defend their work in the face of criticism instead of taking a good look at what they can improve, and these are the authors who think they have nothing to learn.
So they don’t.

This seems like a bit too much, tbh. There’s no such thing as objectivity when it comes to deciding if a book is good or bad (I’m obviously talking about people who have their grammar, orthography and similar tecnical stuff sorted), but if five people say a part of a book is good and one says it’s bad, I wouldn’t even dream of jumping to the conclusion that the person who said it’s bad MUST be right. It’s a possibility, but it’s not the only one. Similarly, if five people say a part of a book is bad and one says it’s good, I would probably trust the majority.

This comic doesn’t imply that the critical person is objectively right. It’s a comic about how some of us are more likely to believe the critic even if we got praise for the same thing because we’re weirdasses who tend to be insecure. I hope you didn’t read this as a prescriptive message to always believe the critic and never believe the fan. If you’re interested in a more sophisticated discussion of how I recommend writers take criticism (and when to ignore it), I suggest this piece.

spacejuliet:

swankivy:

So You Write comic #38: Hater Love.

This may be exaggerated, but it’s true for me: I’m much more likely to agree with my critics (and adjust my writing in response!). Five people could praise a favorite line and then if one person thought it was silly, I’d probably start leaning toward believing it was silly. Some of this is good, adaptive behavior: you WANT readers who will tell you what’s wrong with your story and push you to make it better. But some of it is just Insecure Writer Syndrome™. For some of us, if one reader criticizes something we wrote, we suddenly can’t see the scene the same way and it will bug us until we fix it.

There’s such a thing as too much of this, but most of us have a healthy level of ability to take criticism seriously. We won’t throw our manuscripts in the fireplace and quit writing forever if someone dislikes our work, but we’ll obsess over criticism and it will seem magnified in our minds. This is generally a good thing unless it paralyzes our ability to draft without too much fear. However, much worse than this is its opposite: the authors who savor only the praise and automatically ignore criticism. These are the authors who are more likely to defend their work in the face of criticism instead of taking a good look at what they can improve, and these are the authors who think they have nothing to learn.

So they don’t.

This seems like a bit too much, tbh. There’s no such thing as objectivity when it comes to deciding if a book is good or bad (I’m obviously talking about people who have their grammar, orthography and similar tecnical stuff sorted), but if five people say a part of a book is good and one says it’s bad, I wouldn’t even dream of jumping to the conclusion that the person who said it’s bad MUST be right. It’s a possibility, but it’s not the only one. Similarly, if five people say a part of a book is bad and one says it’s good, I would probably trust the majority.

This comic doesn’t imply that the critical person is objectively right. It’s a comic about how some of us are more likely to believe the critic even if we got praise for the same thing because we’re weirdasses who tend to be insecure. I hope you didn’t read this as a prescriptive message to always believe the critic and never believe the fan. If you’re interested in a more sophisticated discussion of how I recommend writers take criticism (and when to ignore it), I suggest this piece.

Photo 21 Jul 17 notes So You Write comic #38: Hater Love.
This may be exaggerated, but it’s true for me: I’m much more likely to agree with my critics (and adjust my writing in response!). Five people could praise a favorite line and then if one person thought it was silly, I’d probably start leaning toward believing it was silly. Some of this is good, adaptive behavior: you WANT readers who will tell you what’s wrong with your story and push you to make it better. But some of it is just Insecure Writer Syndrome™. For some of us, if one reader criticizes something we wrote, we suddenly can’t see the scene the same way and it will bug us until we fix it.
There’s such a thing as too much of this, but most of us have a healthy level of ability to take criticism seriously. We won’t throw our manuscripts in the fireplace and quit writing forever if someone dislikes our work, but we’ll obsess over criticism and it will seem magnified in our minds. This is generally a good thing unless it paralyzes our ability to draft without too much fear. However, much worse than this is its opposite: the authors who savor only the praise and automatically ignore criticism. These are the authors who are more likely to defend their work in the face of criticism instead of taking a good look at what they can improve, and these are the authors who think they have nothing to learn.
So they don’t.

So You Write comic #38: Hater Love.

This may be exaggerated, but it’s true for me: I’m much more likely to agree with my critics (and adjust my writing in response!). Five people could praise a favorite line and then if one person thought it was silly, I’d probably start leaning toward believing it was silly. Some of this is good, adaptive behavior: you WANT readers who will tell you what’s wrong with your story and push you to make it better. But some of it is just Insecure Writer Syndrome™. For some of us, if one reader criticizes something we wrote, we suddenly can’t see the scene the same way and it will bug us until we fix it.

There’s such a thing as too much of this, but most of us have a healthy level of ability to take criticism seriously. We won’t throw our manuscripts in the fireplace and quit writing forever if someone dislikes our work, but we’ll obsess over criticism and it will seem magnified in our minds. This is generally a good thing unless it paralyzes our ability to draft without too much fear. However, much worse than this is its opposite: the authors who savor only the praise and automatically ignore criticism. These are the authors who are more likely to defend their work in the face of criticism instead of taking a good look at what they can improve, and these are the authors who think they have nothing to learn.

So they don’t.

Text 20 Jul 5 notes My followers think… .

I reblogged this and people responded to say what type of bender I would be. So:

One person said earth:

I think you’d be a waterbender.

tbh i feel like you would be a water bender, no idea why tho

I think you would be a water bender. Something about your personality I guess. Water flows around things, but it slowly wears down even rocks, which is what you do with your constantly educating idiots about Asexuality.

Rilly? Haha. Okay.

And four people said air:

Airbender. First off, you’ve totally got the light-and-airy pixie look going on. Second, you seem pretty good at keeping your cool in arguments and sticking to the facts/logos rather than getting overwhelmed or arguing pathos-style, which reminds me both of Yangchen and of airbending fighting styles. Third, you’d rock the partially-bald/partially-long hairdo.

my first instinct is air. not sure why tho

I see you as an airbender. You don’t take sass, you have a strong spiritual force (expressed outside of a religious context), you are strong willed and patient. You take time to appreciate the intricacies of a situation as opposed to taking a fiery and instantaneous approach to things. You remain level headed in the face of stresses and you have a tendency to evade certain things that will cause you pain. I might be all wrong, this is based purely off of observation and also I’m drunk :)

I see you as an airbender, actually

Well I guess the consensus is air, gonna go become a monk, brb.

NOBODY SAID I WOULD BE A FIREBENDER, HOW TRAGIC.

Photo 20 Jul 38,085 notes emboars:

bonus round: explain why it would fit them best!

emboars:

bonus round: explain why it would fit them best!

(Source: seers)

Link 20 Jul 113 notes The Comment Section: An Exploration of Negative Remarks on the Huffington Post Series About Asexuality»

redbeardace:

Throwing this out to the world.

Let me know if you have any feedback, in particular, if you have any better ways to respond to some of these comments.

I’d like this to be a living section of the site, with new additions from time to time.

I have nothing to say right now except that I will be adding this to my resources immediately. I’ve been eagerly awaiting your deconstruction of these comments and I’m really excited to read through everything you’ve mapped out here. I really like the idea of separating the types of comments into categories, giving examples of subcategories, distilling them, and giving a rationalization of why these attitudes (represented by these comments) are a problem.

Can’t even imagine the headaches that must’ve come from this, but thank you for creating this insightful resource and set of reactions.


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